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foster who came from new england, his father was a u.s. senator. and reverend guy beckley who came from vermont. they managed to keep it going from 1841 to 1848. and that's amazing when you look at the history of newspapers in this country. in 1842, we still have the newspaper being published by the executive committee of the anti-slavery society. and sullivan was the printer out of jackson county. that would change and take over this paper has an article here about written, describing frederick douglass. and it actually says he was first starting to and what it was like to be -- highest view-point that a slave could not necessarily be well educated. to hear these words spoken by and how eloquently he spoke we also have in this issue articles about supporting the liberty party. liberty party electing people one issue on their platform. and that was ending slavery. another really important part of the newspaper is this. they always had a poetry and this one was by whittier, john greenleaf whittier, he published a number of poems that related to slavery and the sadnesss connected with tho
to the legislature and saying help us retrieve our quote, property. so here we have an article about the missouri legislature going to congress and saying to them that under the existing laws of canada, and the treaties between great britain, it is impossible to recover a slave who has once escaped to the canadian shore. and of course, what is the fastest way to get across but from detroit, across the detroit river to get to canada, which is why michigan played such an important part in the underground railroad. so here we have them showing themselves to this whole country, that this issue had become a serious problem. and that slaves were not these contented folk, as they claimed. they were escaping, permanently. from a life they no longer wanted to lead. they wanted their freedom. and they showed it to the world. so this newspaper said look, here it is. getting toward the end of publication. and it is 1847. at this time, beckley has bowed out of publishing. he had written personal letters when he said it was just too great a hardship. he had many children and they were not getting enough to liv
father was a u.s. senator. and reverend guy beckley who came from vermont. they managed to keep it going from 1841 through 1848 and that's really amazing when you look at the history of newspapers in this country. in 1842, we still have a newspaper being published by the executive committee of the anti-slavery society, and sullivan, who was the printer out of jackson county, michigan is still the printer. that's going to change and beckly and foster are going to take over within a short time of managing the newspaper. this newspaper has an article here about -- written, describing frederick douglass. and it's actually, when he was first starting to speak and what it was like to be a slave. and introduced many people who had a biased viewpoint that a slave could not necessarily be well educated. to hear these words spoken by a man who had recently been enslaved. and how eloquently he spoke. we also have in this issue articles about supporting the liberty party. the liberty party would become the national party electing people for president of the united states, the person who ran in the 1
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3